The quietest infestation

One of the scariest things about bed bugs is that you can have an infestation without even knowing it. It is in the nature of these creatures to feast on you when you are at your most vulnerable, unconsciously asleep. They are masterful hiders which makes it harder to kill these pests as well. Here are some tell tale signs to look for to spot an infestation, but remember that you can always call Arizona Heat Pest for a free quote and inspection from the best in the business.

It’s no secret that bed bugs are seriously freaky creatures. After all, they like to live in your bed and feed on your blood while you’re sleeping. Now, scientists at Rutgers University are trying to determine where bed bug outbreaks happen, and how to prevent and control them.

In a new study published in the Journal of Medical Entomology, Rutgers researchers examined more than 2,000 low-income apartments in New Jersey for the presence of bed bugs. What they discovered: 12 percent of apartments had bed bug infestations.

Researchers also found that beds were “significantly” more likely to contain bed bugs than sofas or upholstered chairs, and women were more likely to report bed bug bite symptoms than men (although they didn’t specify whether women had worse reactions or were simply more sensitive to the bites).

And, perhaps the most disturbing finding: While 68 percent of people with bed bug infestations had symptoms, nearly 50 percent of the bed bug infestations happened in apartments where residents didn’t know they had the critters.

So, how are you supposed to know if you have bed bugs or just some skin condition? Experts say there are a few telling signs.

One of the most common symptoms is waking up with bites or finding bites on your body that you can’t explain, bed bug expert Jeffrey White, technical director for BedBug Central, tells SELF. But there’s a caveat: Everyone reacts differently to being bitten by a bed bug. “For some people, it can take up to two weeks for them to react,” White says.

The bites themselves don’t look unique to bed bugs, White says, but they do tend to show up on the arms, shoulders, neck, and face—all of which are exposed while you’re sleeping, and therefore easier to reach. Bites that show up in rows or clusters are also concerning, he says.

Read more at: http://bit.ly/1N8VvJQ

 

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